Arbitration – Ingredients of

According to concise law dictionary by Mozley and Whiteley, ‘Arbitration’ means where two or more parties submit all matters in dispute to the judgment of Arbitrator who is to decide the controversy. Halsbury defines’ Arbitration as “the reference of dispute or difference between not less than two parties, for determination, after both sides in a judicial manner, by a person or persons other than a court of competent jurisdiction.” Taking into account the definition of arbitration by Halsbury, the following ingredients would be necessary to constitute the arbitration:

  • There is a real dispute between two or more parties;
  • There is arbitration clause in the agreement for reference of dispute to the arbitration;
  • According to the arbitration clause the dispute or difference is referred to person or persons other than a court of competent jurisdiction;
  • Such person or persons constituting arbitration are obliged to hear both the parties and decide the dispute in a judicial manner.

Clause (h) of Section 2(1) of the Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996 defines the expression “party” to mean ‘a party to an arbitration agreement.’ This clause is also a new one and did not exist in the old Act of 1940. This expression is also not mentioned in UNCITRAL Model Law and is not available under the English Arbitration Act, 1996. The definition makes it clear that a party, which is not a party to an arbitration agreement, is not covered within the definition of term “Party” for the purpose of Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996. The definition of ‘party’ will also include the legal representatives of such party. A person who is not a party to an arbitration agreement cannot pray for the enforcement of the agreement or the appointment of an arbitrator. The term ‘party’ in this clause has narrowed down the scope of the word ‘party’ as commonly understood. It has made clear that non-parties to the contract have no right under the Act for seeking Arbitration and consequently an Award. Bharat Catering Corporation v. Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation Ltd., 2016 (118) ALR 666.

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