Workman – Accident and Injury

‘Accident’ and ‘Injury’ are distinct in cases where accident is an event happening externally to a man, eg., when a workman falls from the ladder and suffers injury. The less obvious cases of accident are strain causing rupture, bursting of aneurism, failure of muscular action of the heart, exposure to draught causing chill, etc. Such accidents can be called as internal accidents. In such cases, it is hardly possible to distinguish between the ‘accident’ and ‘injury’. The rupture is an accident, at the same time injury leading to death or incapacity at once or after a lapse of time. Thus in cases of internal accidents, “Accident” and “Injury” coincide. But the common factor in all cases of accident, whether internal or external is some concrete happening at a definite point of time and incapacity resulting from such happening. An accident happening to a person in or about any premises at which, he is for the time being employed for the purpose of his Employer’s trade or business shall be deemed to raise out of and in the course of employment.
At times accident need not be due to immediate cause or as a result of collusion or sudden mishap. Even a non-spontaneous injury resulting in death or causing injury to workman during the course or arising out of employment can also be termed as accidental injury.
The word ‘Injury’ includes physiological injury. The physiological injury suffered by a workman due mainly to the progress of a disease unconnected with employment, may amount to an injury arising out of and in the course of employment if the work which the workman was doing at the time of the occurrence of the injury contributed to its occurrence. The connection between the injury and employment may be furnished by ordinary strain of ordinary work if the strain did in fact contribute to or accelerate or hasten the injury. M.D., Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation v. Jayalakshmi, 2014 (142) FLR 978.

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Filed under Accident and Injury, Labour Law

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